Modeling the biogeochemical impact of atmospheric phosphate deposition from desert dust and combustion sources to the Mediterranean Sea (bibtex)
by , , , ,
Abstract:
We used phosphate deposition from natural dust, anthropogenic combustion and wildfires simulated for the year 2005 by a global atmospheric chemical transport model (LMDz–INCA) as additional sources of external nutrient for a high resolution regional coupled dynamical–biogeochemical model of the Mediterranean Sea. In general, dust is considered as the main atmospheric source of phosphorus, but the LMDz–INCA model suggests that combustion is dominant over natural dust as an atmospheric source of phosphate (the bioavailable form of phosphorus in seawater) for the Mediterranean Sea. According to the atmospheric transport model, anthropogenic phosphate deposition from combustion (Pcomb) brings on average 40.5 10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 over the entire Mediterranean Sea for the year 2005 and is the primary source over the northern part (101 10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 from combustion deposited in 2005 over the North Adriatic against 12.4 10−6 from dust). Lithogenic dust brings 17.2 10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 on average over the Mediterranean Sea in 2005 and is the primary source of atmospheric phosphate to the southern Mediterranean basin in our simulations (31.8 10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 from dust deposited in 2005 on average over the South Ionian basin against 12.4 10−6 from combustion). We examine separately the different soluble phosphorus (PO4) sources and their respective fluxes variability and evaluate their impacts on marine surface biogeochemistry (phosphate concentrations, Chl a, primary production). The impacts of the different phosphate deposition sources on the biogeochemistry of the Mediterranean are found localized, seasonally varying and small, but yet statistically significant. The impact of the different sources of phosphate on the biogeochemical cycles is remarkably different and should be accounted for in modeling studies.
Reference:
Modeling the biogeochemical impact of atmospheric phosphate deposition from desert dust and combustion sources to the Mediterranean Sea (C. Richon, J.-C. Dutay, F. Dulac, R. Wang, Y. Balkanski), In Biogeosciences Discuss., volume 2017, 2017.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{	  richon.ea_2017,
  title		= {Modeling the biogeochemical impact of atmospheric
		  phosphate deposition from desert dust and combustion
		  sources to the {Mediterranean} {Sea}},
  volume	= {2017},
  issn		= {1810-6285},
  url		= {http://www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/bg-2017-242/},
  doi		= {10.5194/bg-2017-242},
  abstract	= {We used phosphate deposition from natural dust,
		  anthropogenic combustion and wildfires simulated for the
		  year 2005 by a global atmospheric chemical transport model
		  (LMDz–INCA) as additional sources of external nutrient
		  for a high resolution regional coupled
		  dynamical–biogeochemical model of the Mediterranean Sea.
		  In general, dust is considered as the main atmospheric
		  source of phosphorus, but the LMDz–INCA model suggests
		  that combustion is dominant over natural dust as an
		  atmospheric source of phosphate (the bioavailable form of
		  phosphorus in seawater) for the Mediterranean Sea.
		  According to the atmospheric transport model, anthropogenic
		  phosphate deposition from combustion (Pcomb) brings on
		  average 40.5 10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 over the
		  entire Mediterranean Sea for the year 2005 and is the
		  primary source over the northern part (101
		  10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 from combustion
		  deposited in 2005 over the North Adriatic against 12.4
		  10−6 from dust). Lithogenic dust brings 17.2
		  10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 on average over the
		  Mediterranean Sea in 2005 and is the primary source of
		  atmospheric phosphate to the southern Mediterranean basin
		  in our simulations (31.8
		  10−6 mol PO4 m−2 year−1 from dust deposited
		  in 2005 on average over the South Ionian basin against 12.4
		  10−6 from combustion). We examine separately the
		  different soluble phosphorus (PO4) sources and their
		  respective fluxes variability and evaluate their impacts on
		  marine surface biogeochemistry (phosphate concentrations,
		  Chl a, primary production). The impacts of the different
		  phosphate deposition sources on the biogeochemistry of the
		  Mediterranean are found localized, seasonally varying and
		  small, but yet statistically significant. The impact of the
		  different sources of phosphate on the biogeochemical cycles
		  is remarkably different and should be accounted for in
		  modeling studies.},
  journal	= {Biogeosciences Discuss.},
  author	= {Richon, C. and Dutay, J.-C. and Dulac, F. and Wang, R. and
		  Balkanski, Y.},
  month		= jun,
  year		= {2017},
  pages		= {1--33}
}
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